Falling in a Forest

My practice aligns with the eco-art movement with ecological themes highlighting deforestation. I became an enquiring researcher to confront anthropogenic climate change caused by expanding civilization and overexploitation of the Earth’s natural resources; focusing on controlled environments that emulate different atmospheres, specifically those being deforested. Botanical gardens conserve species and create artificial environments as zones for protection, research and awareness of flora. The protection and conservation of plants is in stark contrasts with the general public’s disregard and ignorance of worldwide deforestation. My photographic practice questions the sincerity of conservation efforts; asking whether there is sufficient respect of nature to provide for humans and the rest of the world’s biodiversity to co-exist.

Natural Birth
Time
Don't Tap the Glass
Is there enough room on Earth for humans and the rest of the world’s biodiversity?

I photograph botanic flora from the position of the other, gazing through onto alternate climates that emulate native endangered landscapes. The role of the viewer is to question whether it is justifiable for humans to encroach upon natural spaces for economic, political and cultural gains. This juxtaposes the creation of protected areas, such as Botanical Gardens funded by Government organisations, in the name of conservation.

Enough Room
Botanics
Botanics
Through the Window
Botanics
Through the Window
Splinters

To contextualise my practice and explore the process of deforestation, I visited a commercial felling site. I took an observational and documentary approach in order to understand the process and bear witness to the felling. I interviewed the workmen and photographed all aspects of the location; in order to render my thoughts and opinions of the experience that can be translated within my practice. An interesting juxtaposition at the site was the logs lining the edge of the forestry; where the trees would be standing at one moment and lying as part of a commodity the next moment.

Splinters
Seed Bank

My emphasis turned to looking at the Millennium Seed Bank at Wakehurst Place; seen within the seed laboratory images. The seeds are taken for conservation and cultivated to be grown and planted in the artificial, managed landscapes. My final images explore the techno-utopian idea of recreating plant life artificially through bio-engineering. Presenting the images Natural Birth and Time in a triptych with the poem, Don’t Tap the Glass, creates circularity within the images, showing cultivated seeds becoming a protected botanic environment; a possible future for endemic endangered environments. My work asks the controversial questions; how natural is the natural world? Is the future of bio-diversity to be viewed behind glass? How many places within the world remain untouched by human management?

Seed Bank